News

New Erasmus Law Review special Issue and new Book out!

The latest issue of Erasmus Law Review, edited by Xandra Kramer and John Sorabji, is dedicated to International Business Courts. It contains eleven papers focusing on a specific jurisdiction or on horizontal issues, including on international jurisdiction and lawyers’ preferences in international litigation. This special issue results from the seminar ‘Innovating International Business Courts: a European Outlook’, and includes the speaker contributions to that seminar and additional articles resulting from a call for papers on this blog. 

The complete issue can be downloaded here.

Similtaneously a book expanding on the topic and including views from twelve jurisdictions has just been published: International Business Courts: A European and Global Perspective  (eds. Xandra Kramer & John Sorabji), Eleven International Publishing 2019. (order form

The electronic version of this book will become available open access soon.

These publications result from and are financed by the ERC Consolidator project Building EU Civil Justice at the Erasmus School of Law in Rotterdam.

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EU flag ERC logo

Published: February 18, 2019

During the guest lecture ‘International commercial courts in Europe: Tips and tricks to go viral’ Georgia Antonopoulou and Erlis Themeli asked the master students of the Private Law master program of the Erasmus School of Law to prepare a pitch and a logo promoting the Netherlands Commercial Court (NCC), which just opened its doors in January 2019. In the shadow of Brexit, EU Member States increasingly establish international commercial courts aspiring to attract cross-border disputes often resolved before the London Commercial Court. In their assignments, the students had to highlight the strengths of the NCC in comparison to similar international commercial courts in Europe. The students actively promoted the new court and translated its pros and innovative features in a short pitch and logo. Interestingly enough, few students questioned the need to advertise courts and claimed that justice is a public service that should not be approached from a market perspective. In the end the students voted in favour of Dorian Acoca. Acoca’s pitch was the most persuasive and his logo was the most eye-catching. Now, it is the time for Dorian and his logo to go viral just as the courts. Well done!