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Seminar series EU Civil Justice

The ERC Building EU Civil Justice team is running a series of seminars. The series covers a variety of topics in the field of European civil justice and zoom in on the key topics our group has been working on over the past four years. These include the privatization and digitalization of civil justice, cross-border judicial co-operation, international business courts, and self-representation. Each session will bring together invited speakers and our own researchers. To join us for one or more of these sessions, please register here over Eventbrite.

Coming Up:

Thursday, 15 July (15.30-17.30 CET)

European Civil Justice in Transition: Past, Present & Future

In this last seminar of the series several highly regarded academics in the area of European civil justice shed their light on key current and future issues, including digitisation, collective redress, ADR and funding of civil justice.

Speakers: Alan Uzelac, Burkhard Hess, Eva Storskrubb and John Sorabji (moderated by Alexandre Biard and Xandra Kramer)


Past:

Thursday, 1 July (16:00-18:00)

Representing Future Generations: Private Law aspects of Climate Change Litigation.

Friday, 2 July (09:30-11:30)

The Arbitralization of Courts

Thursday, 6 May (15:00-17:00)

The Role of Out-of-Court Justice in the European Enforcement Regime

Friday, 21 May (10:00-12:00)

Modernising European Cross-Border Judicial Collaboration

Friday, 4 June (10:00-12:00)

Digital Constitutionalism and European Digital Policies

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EU flag ERC logo

Published: February 18, 2019

During the guest lecture ‘International commercial courts in Europe: Tips and tricks to go viral’ Georgia Antonopoulou and Erlis Themeli asked the master students of the Private Law master program of the Erasmus School of Law to prepare a pitch and a logo promoting the Netherlands Commercial Court (NCC), which just opened its doors in January 2019. In the shadow of Brexit, EU Member States increasingly establish international commercial courts aspiring to attract cross-border disputes often resolved before the London Commercial Court. In their assignments, the students had to highlight the strengths of the NCC in comparison to similar international commercial courts in Europe. The students actively promoted the new court and translated its pros and innovative features in a short pitch and logo. Interestingly enough, few students questioned the need to advertise courts and claimed that justice is a public service that should not be approached from a market perspective. In the end the students voted in favour of Dorian Acoca. Acoca’s pitch was the most persuasive and his logo was the most eye-catching. Now, it is the time for Dorian and his logo to go viral just as the courts. Well done!