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Online courts during the Covid-19 pandemic in the Netherlands: Conference presentation

On 17-18 February 2021, the Bar Ilan University Faculty of Law organised the conference Digital Governance in the Times of Covid-19. The Conference focused on changes brought about by the Covid-19 pandemic and how many aspects of our (legal) life turned from analogue to digital. During the second day, Erlis Themeli presented in the Online Courts During Covid-19 and Beyond panel, together with Professor Schmitz (University of Missouri School of Law) and Adv. Naqui (PEW Charitable Trusts). Erlis spoke on how in the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic Dutch courts went digital. He considered this event both a cure and a disease. A disease because it threatened the right to access to justice for many; but also a cure, because it showed that courts can be dynamic and use technology to improve access to justice for many. Two other panels in the conference focused on Algorithmic Regulation and Digital Policy Tools During Covid-19 and Zoom Parliaments During Covid-19 respectively. Two keynote speeches from Prof. Frank Pasquale (Brooklyn Law School) and Prof. Richard Susskind (Oxford) provided a fertile ground for discussion and interesting ideas for further research.

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Published: February 22, 2021

On 10 February 2021, Georgia and Erlis were invited as guest lectures at the Private Law Master programme of the Erasmus School of Law. This was a special master class where students follow advanced level lectures from experts in the field. They were asked to lecture about international commercial courts, which is a topic of growing importance. Georgia and Erlis consider that the competition of civil justice systems and dispute resolution methods incites international commercial courts to market their features in order to raise awareness on their recent establishment and attract disputes. This development raises many questions about the development of these courts in particular and public litigation in general. Before the lecture, students were asked to reflect on this topic and discuss with Georgia and Erlis. The class was successful in drawing up the complex nature and activities of international commercial courts, but it also produced food for thoughts for both students and lecturers.