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Out now: Research Methods in Private International Law

The book Research Methods in International Private Law: A Handbook on Regulation, Research and Teaching has been published (Elgar, 2024). It is edited by Xandra Kramer and Laura Carballo Piñeiro. It includes 18 chapters, two of which are authored by other members of the Vici team, Carlota Ucín and Adriani Dori. Carlota’s chapter focuses on conflict of methods in private international law from a legal theory perspective and Adriani’s chapter on the methodological influence of European private international law on domestic legal systems. The book is part of the Handbook in the Research Methods of Law Series of Edward Elgar Publishing. It seeks to provide insights into the different methodological approaches to private international law from a regulatory approach and from a research and educational perspective. The book is divided in three parts focusing on (1) the classification of private international law as private law and its interaction with international public law and regulation; (2) inter- and multi-disciplinary approaches and research methods; and (3) how private international law helps to frame and address the critical debates of our time as well as the role of legal scholarship and education in shaping the future of private international law. The book will be launched and introduced in two webinars in September 2024.

Critical acclaims are available here.

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Published: March 2, 2020

In February, we hosted Anna Wysocka-Bar as a guest researcher at our team and Erasmus School of Law. Anna is a lecturer at Jagiellonian University (Poland) and an academic coordinator of a Jean Monnet Module 2019-2022 on European private international law. She holds PhD degree (the thesis on party autonomy in international succession law was successfully defended at Jagiellonian University, Poland) and an LLM in law and technology (Ottawa University, Canada).

Anna reported: "I came to Rotterdam to kick-off my research on the interaction between EU private international law and unified transport law conventions. Within three weeks of my stay in the Netherlands, I profited greatly from the Sanders Law Library in Rotterdam and Peace Palace Library in the Hague, attended seminars and guest lectures, spotted best practices when observing how EU private international law is taught at Erasmus School of Law, and, last but not least, was given the opportunity to discuss my ideas with top experts from Erasmus University – the hub of international transport, trade and private international law in Europe. My stay in the Netherlands was possible thanks to the famous Dutch hospitality and a research grant from the Miniatura programme of the National Science Center (Poland)."